When you’re in business, marketing will be an ongoing concern of yours as you work to ensure that awareness of your brand is spreading and growing. In any industry, this concern likely remains consistent yet much more manageable than it was in the early days of your company since you will probably have more of a budget to work with. 

However, this might not be true when you operate a non-profit organisation, for which your marketing budget could remain continuously low. Fortunately, this doesn’t mean that you’re devoid of options; it just might mean that you have to get creative in order to maximise the potential of your available options.

Signing Up 


Regardless of the nature of your organisation – be it a political campaign or a charity – getting your loyal members and audience to sign up for what you have to say might mean they receive a weekly (or monthly) update via text or email. This doesn’t have to be as flat as a simple message; through email, you can even attach links to documents like newsletters, which grant the opportunity to present your information in a more appealing and eye-catching manner. 

If you’re looking to text message campaigns for your political marketing, however, you might want to know what you can do to make it more engaging and effective. In this instance, it might benefit you to conduct research on political texts examples to get an idea of how you can best structure your own messages going forwards.

Social Media


When you don’t have much money to spare, social media will always be a valuable option for various reasons. First of all, many different social media outlets are available, each of which can house any number of communities, with different platforms and communities granting you access to diverse demographics. Furthermore, the cost of entry to these platforms is usually low or nothing, meaning you can get started immediately. 

Once again, for political campaigns, this will provide you with a way to give your audience members information that they need, and charities can update followers on events happening soon that they can get involved with. Having an open forum to discuss things with your followers can also benefit your working relationship, affording a level of transparency, engagement and humanity that seldom traiditonal campaign methods like newsletters cannot achieve.

Events


Events that you might organise and market through social media are, in themselves, great marketing opportunities. They could stretch your budget, but they’re a chance to get collaborators involved. Plus, partnering organisations might also want to use these events for the same reasons, so you might find that some successful pitching could see you with more support. 

Making a day of such events and marketing them properly through previously mentioned channels – as well as handing out physical leaflets in the local area where the event is set to take place – could mean that people entirely unfamiliar with you come down to have a nice day out. This is your chance to show them what you’re all about and why they might want to get involved with your organisation.